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The common qualities of the near-death experience include feelings of profound peace, out-of-body sensation, meeting with “beings of light” and with one’s deceased relatives, reviewing on’s life and a reluctance to return. Dr. Moody explores the significance of these experiences for our understanding of the collective unconscious, emphasizing the value of wisdom and love as being primary in human life.

 

The Korean Powerhouse

For many year now, Korean Cinema has become the leading light of asia and a constant source of inspiration as Hollywood looks east to create blockbusting remakes of well received asian movies. And we believe it will not be long for Hollywood to adapt this latest fantasy movie called Lucid Dream. An impressive thriller based on a similar setting as Christopher Nolan’s Inception.

With an impressive supporting cast headed by Sul Kyung-gu and Kang Hye-jeong, a very popular protagonist in the face of Go Soo, and a more than interesting script based on the concept of the lucid dream, the film ticked all the prerequisites of being a masterpiece.

The Plotline

Dae-ho is an investigative journalist, whose only son is kidnapped at a theme park. Devastated, he gives up his career and devotes himself to finding the perpetrator and his son, but to no avail. Eventually, he learns about lucid dream, a method that allows the patient to control, to some extent, what is happening in his dreams. The method is used for therapeutic purposes, in order for patients to recall lost, traumatic experiences, but Dae-ho, with the help of So-hyeon (Kang Hye-jeong), a friend who is an expert in the field, decides to use the process to find out what happened to his son during the day he was kidnapped. During this process, he faces various obstacles, side effects, and unexpected acquaintances, as he is also assisted by Officer Song Bang-seop (Sul Kyung-gu), who actually believes his findings.

Master of Dreams

Kim Joon-seong-I directs and pens an interesting crime thriller in his debut, setting the film apart by using the concept of lucid dreaming. While the build up and the many plot twists manage to retain the interest of the spectator for the most of the duration, I felt that he took his basic premise a bit too far, as the story also features “masters of dreams”, forceful entries into other people’s dreams, and even a double entry into the same dream. Kim uses these tactics to keep the production entertaining by inducing much action in the film, but in the process, he seems to lose control of the story, even if one considers it a fantasy. In that fashion, he also does not seem to deal very much with the actual concept of the lucid dream, which becomes just an “excuse” for all that is happening on screen.

Furthermore, Kim does not make good use of his cast, particularly of Sul Kyung-gu as Officer Song and Kang Hye-jeong as So-hyeon, with their parts being undeveloped, particularly the latter’s, who becomes almost insignificant after a fashion. At the same time, the choice of Go Soo as Choi Dae-ho seems an unfortunate one, as his physique does not fit the character at all, and I found his performance excessive, particularly in the scenes where the melodrama takes over. I dare say that if the two male actors switched places, the movie would be a much better one.

Stunning

In terms of visuals on the other hand, “Lucid Dream” is outstanding, with Park Hyun-chul’s cinematography presenting the differences between the real and the dream world in impressive fashion, with prowess that finds its apogee in the action scenes. The same applies to Kim Jae-beom and Kim Sang-beom‘,s editing, which retains the sense of confusion between what is real and what dream in a way that retains the agony for the biggest part of the film.

 

 

 

 

A Rare Account of Liberation from Prison

Many people believe that the subject of astral projection can be highly influenced by media and expectations, so when Jack London, the author of White Fang and the Call of the Wild is introduced to a man who discovers the ability to leave his body while in prison with no previous knowledge on the subject. We feel we are given a rare glimpse at a person whose raw experiences in the out of body states are an amazing validation of the experiences.

Jack London’s last published novel before his death tells the story of a prisoner in solitary confinement who escapes the pain of a straitjacket by astral travels. Despite some critics’ assertions that it’s his greatest book, The Star Rover has never been very popular. It was written in 1913-14, when London was probably the most famous writer in America. Yet when published in 1915, it sold fewer copies than any of his previous works and eventually went out of print. It was republished in England in 1967 under the title The Jacket, and appears to only recently have been reprinted in America.

From Prison Reform to Astral Travel

The two main themes are prison reform and astral travel through past lives. When London was 16 years old he was imprisoned for 30 days for vagrancy, “an experience he found so traumatic that he vowed that thenceforward instead of actually living the hobo life which had left him friendless and terrified behind bars, he would only write about it—and doing so get rich and famous.
A reader might think London himself had practiced, or at least was interested in, reincarnation and astral travel. However, it appears London’s mother, a spiritualist who conducted séances, may have been an initial inspiration. “London consciously seems to have felt that these practices were a sham,” wrote Stewart Gabel.
Fiedler relates that London never had an out-of-body experience himself, but learned about it from Ed Morrell, a convicted felon on whom the story is based. While in California’s San Quentin State Prison, Morrell was accused of having a secret stash of dynamite and spent five years in solitary confinement, much of in the jacket, due to the false accusation (the same story as in London’s novel). Morrell inadvertently learned etheric projection while in the jacket, and was able to walk around San Francisco and confirm his experiences were real. (One time he witnessed a shipwreck just off the coast that he later read about in the papers.) His journeys are recounted in his memoirs, The 25th Man – The Strange Story of Ed Morrell, the Hero of Jack London’s Star Rover. Eventually Morrell was released from prison and became an outspoken prison reformer. The words of London’s protagonist Darrell Standing could have been spoken by him:

Solitary confinement, they call it. Men who endure it, call it living death. But through these five years of death-in-life I managed to attain freedom such as few men have ever known. Closest-confined of prisoners, not only did I range the world, but I ranged time. They who immured me for petty years gave to me, all unwittingly, the largess of centuries.

A Quick Guide to Astral Travel

When Standing first starts to have out-of-body experiences (OBOEs), his method is to put his conscious mind to sleep and then let loose his subconscious mind. At first his subconscious was undisciplined and incoherent. Then Ed Morrell—whom London made a character in The Star Rover—teaches him a method that could be straight out of a book on self-hypnosis or astral projection.

In the novel, Morrell is a few cells away from Standing, also in solitary confinement. Unable to talk to each other due to the watchful eye of guards, he teaches Standing how to have a more intense OBO via their secret language of knuckle-rapping on the cell bars. Morrell tells him to will himself to die: Lying on your back, you start with a toe and use your will to make it die, and work your way up the body until your body is completely dead and only the consciousness remains:

The thing you must think and believe is that your body is one thing and your spirit is another thing. You are you, and your body is something else that don’t amount to shucks. Your body don’t count. You’re the boss. You don’t need any body. And thinking and believing all this you proceed to prove it by using your will. You make your body die.

Using this method Standing feels his mind enlarging and time and space expanding until he knows without opening his eyes that he’s no longer in his cell. His heart slows so much he can no longer count the space between its beats. His first experience is among the stars. He then journeys through numerous past lives, which he writes down later on Murderer’s Row. Time passes so quickly in the jacket, he’s no longer afraid of the warden’s constant threats to make him reveal his nonexistent stash of explosives: “Dynamite or curtains!”

The Star Rover Through Time

Many of Standing’s past life experiences are based on actual historical figures. He relives the life of Daniel Foss, who was shipwrecked on a barren island in 1809, lived off seal meat for five years, and later wrote A journal of the shipwreck and sufferings of Daniel Foss. In another life, Standing is a young boy involved in the Mountain Meadows massacre in Utah in 1857, when Mormon settlers conspired with members of the Paiute Indian tribe to slaughter a group of pioneers in covered wagons. Another past life is based on an account written by Hendrick Hamel, who was shipwrecked with other Dutchmen in Korea in the mid-seventeenth century. He was also a friend of Pilate in Rome who discusses divergent views of the afterlife with a devotee of Jesus. Standing eventually concludes Memory is only thing that remains after death—similar to the views of experienced astral traveler Aleister Crowley.

An Ode to the Eternal Feminine

A sense of peace and quiet joy comes at the end of the sometimes-depressing novel, when Standing realizes that in all of his lives, for all the times he fought, risked his life, and even died, it was for the love of woman. It has been for woman that man has tamed the horse, slew the mammoth, and harvested rice and wheat. Even in his heavens, “Valkyrie or houri, man has fain made place for her, for he could see no heaven without her.” Standing continues his praise of the eternal woman:

I conclude that the greatest thing in life, in all lives, to me and to all men, has been woman, is woman, and will be woman so long as the stars drift in the sky and the heavens flux eternal change. Greater than our toil and endeavour, the play of invention and fancy, battle and star-gazing and mystery—greatest of all has been woman.

The Star Rover should have a place on lists of top American novels and top occult novels. Some have said it’s like a collection of short stories delving into all of London’s interests, and each past life is quite fascinating for a general historical overview. Others have compared it to The Count of Monte Cristo. London’s last novel before his untimely death in 1916 at age 40, The Star Rover weaves together social reform, men’s rights, reincarnation, and historical drama, and will be a riveting read to anyone interested in astral travel or past life regression.

The Star Rover is highly recommended reading from the Astral Institute.

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Elon Musk is planning to get to Mars. But can there be a better way for humans to explore the Universe than depending on the limitation of technology. When it comes to limited vision, modern leaders are still not willing to explore outside the normal dictates of science. Why do we have generations of innovators not willing to research the possibilities of out of body states as a way to explore the universe. When will a new class of public figure have the courage to leap down the rabbit hole.

If Elon was willing to engage with organisations like the Monroe Institute and dedicate a short stay to explore the possibility that altered states and out of body experience. If they were open minded enough to validate their reality, imagine the jump in world consciousness, these studies would have with the backing and possible funding from such a high profile influencers on the global stage.

Stanford Scientists observe man travel out of his body…

A gentlemen by the name of Ingo Swann was able to successfully describe and view a ring around Jupiter, a ring that scientists had no idea existed. This took place immediately before the first ever flyby of Jupiter by NASA’s Pioneer 10 spacecraft, which confirmed that the ring did actually exist. These results were published in advance of the rings’ discovery.

The successful viewing of the ring by Ingo came after scientists observed him identify physical objects in hidden envelopes that were placed a few hundred kilometers away.

“Successful replication of this type of remote viewing in independent laboratories has yielded considerable scientific evidence for the reality of the [remote viewing] phenomenon. Adding to the strength of these results was the discovery that a growing number of individuals could be found to demonstrate high-quality remote viewing, often to their own surprise. The CIA even participated as remote viewers themselves in order to critique the protocols. CIA personnel generated successful target descriptions of sufficiently high quality to permit blind matching of descriptions to targets by independent judges.”

– Harold Puthoff, PhD, Stanford University

It’s remarkable to think about these extended human capacities, and what we are capable of. At the same time, it’s sobering to think about how much information is dismissed, classified, and hidden from the human race. It makes you wonder what other information out there remains classified that we don’t yet know about, and what other truths the remote viewing program has uncovered.

The Above Information Was Documented. Here’s What Wasn’t.

Here is a quote from Ingo’s book Penetration, where he goes into detail about  a phenomenon that was not documented in the literature cited throughout this article:

It’s one thing to read about UFOs and stuff in the papers or in books. It is another to hear rumors about the military or government having an interest in such matters, rumors which say they have captured extraterrestrials and downed alien space craft. But it’s quite another matter to find oneself in a situation which confirms everything. I found towers, machinery, lights, buildings, humanoids busy at work on something I couldn’t figure out (on the back side of the moon).

The information now available in the public domain regarding the government experiments with remote viewing was declassified in 1995, but who knows how much of the program’s information is still classified? Ingo had expressed that the program was shut down because it posed one of the biggest threats to government secrecy.

It’s quite remarkable that this information was kept secret for over 20 years. Prior to 1995, the public had absolutely no idea that this type of thing was going on; it was a special access program, part of the Black Budget, which to this day deals with projects and data the human race knows nothing about.

“The day science begins to study non-physical phenomena, it will make more progress in one decade than in all the previous centuries of its existence.”

– Nikola Tesla

Science has indeed studied non-physical phenomenon for a very long time. Unfortunately, much of this science has been locked up within the classified world, and the remote viewing program is a great example of that.

 

Source for the article come from Collective Evolution

 

Dan Millman introduced his first book, Whole Body Fitness, establishing his foray into the authorial realm in 1979. Since then Millman has written an impressive 16 books, both fiction and nonfiction, and all focus on the conscious evolution of the mind and body. Dan’s books have been translated to 29 languages and have influenced millions of lives. Perhaps his most popular book, Way of the Peaceful Warrior, was adapted to film in 2006.

The Final Chapter

The Hidden School reveals a book within a book, a quest within a quest, and a bridge between worlds.

In the long-awaited conclusion to the international bestselling Peaceful Warrior saga, Dan Millman takes readers on an epic spiritual quest across the world as he searches for the link between everyday life and transcendent possibility.

Continuing his journey from Way of the Peaceful Warrior, Dan Millman moves from Honolulu to the Mojave Desert, and from a bustling Asian city to a secluded forest, until he uncovers the mystery of The Hidden School. While traversing continents, he uncovers lessons of life hidden in plain sight—insights pointing the way to an inspired life in the eternal present.

Along the way, you’ll encounter remarkable characters and brushes with mortality as you explore the nature of reality, the self, death, and finally, a secret as ancient as the roots of this world. Awaken to the hidden powers of paradox, humor, and change. Discover a vision that may forever change your perspectives about life’s promise and potential.

 

GET IT NOW

 

In Flatliners, medical students experiment on “near death” experiences that involve past tragedies until the dark consequences begin to jeopardize their lives. In Flatliners, five medical students, hoping to gain insight into the mystery of what lies beyond the confines of life, embark on a daring and dangerous experiment. By stopping their hearts for short periods of time, each triggers a near-death experience. As the investigation becomes more and more perilous, they are forced to confront the sins of their pasts, as well as contend with the paranormal consequences of trespassing to the other side.

Flatliners, which stars Ellen Page, is a follow-up to the 1990 cult psychological horror of the same name about a group of medical students who seek to find out the truth about the afterlife by subjecting each other to near-death experiences. The original film starred Kiefer Sutherland, Julia Roberts and Kevin Bacon. Sutherland will appear in the sequel.

Plot

The trailer for the new film suggests it follows a similar plot to the original, with Page and her fellow students conducting experiments on each other that prompt dangerous paranormal experiences. James Norton (Happy Valley) and Diego Luna (Rogue One) are among the other cast members, while Niels Arden Oplev, who is best known for his work on the original Swedish adaptation of The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, is on directorial duties.

Source : The Guardian

What does “raising consciousness” actually mean?

It is often portrayed as some sort of super-human accomplishment that will grant us spiritual super powers… but it is simply about becoming freer within ourselves. The freer we feel within, the LIGHTER we are. Becoming “enlightened” is simply about lightening up. We can now forget about becoming something more “special.” Raising our consciousness is simply the process of lightening up our load of fears and limiting beliefs so that we can travel lighter on our journey!

1. Be You in Every Moment

Yep, it’s that simple. Replace pretence with your presence. You don’t have to wait until you feel “good,” “perfect,” or “enlightened,” or wait for something to happen for you to relax into your own being. You don’t need to look at another’s journey and compare, judge, or doubt yourself, either. This type of thinking just tricks you out of the perfection of you in this moment anyways. No matter what you are feeling or what the situation is, just be you and let the rest unfold.

2. Let Go of the Fear of Feeling

Open Doors. This is a big one. Discovering who we are is no different than opening the door of a house — the house being a metaphor for our human mind. It’s a great step; we’re letting some light in! But does it mean we have visited it thoroughly? Does it necessarily mean we have experienced each room, opened every closet, and even spent some time in the “scary” basement? Perhaps we have quickly peaked in each room, but have we taken the time to explore them fully, meditate in them, open the windows to let some light in, and perhaps do a little cleanup? Are we okay with leaving the doors open for us and others to see?

The light of our awareness isn’t limited to entering what is comfortable and acceptable to the mind. It is here to illuminate all rooms — even those dusty closets with all of the old, emotionally charged baggage we have been reluctant to explore. What has laid dormant within each room is often ignored. But now, the winds of change are blowing all doors open and many of us are feeling and re-experiencing many emotions that we have once protected ourselves from feeling again. The only thing that blocks us from seeing the blessing in letting the wind blow us open is the fear of feeling. When we choose to not be controlled and defined by this fear anymore, we naturally keep all of our doors open knowing that it cannot break who we are, but only identities with old patterns that were limiting our inner freedom and peace anyways.

3. Remove Your Masks (Even Your Spiritual Mask)

Can you identify as nothing in particular? For example, look at a bunny, a bird, or a flower. Is the bunny hopping around thinking it’s a bunny, is the bird singing because it knows “that’s what birds do,” and is the beauty of a flower experienced via its name, or is it simply witnessed in silence? The same goes with us. Let’s not dismiss the BEING within the term “human being.” The less we let ourselves be defined by rigid identities, the more space we allow for our own authentic presence to shine through, and the lighter and more alive we feel. Take a moment to breathe in this very moment and identify as NO-THING. There you are…

U.S. Marshal Mike Donovan (Vincent Cassel) (referred to as Broken Nose by the native tribe; unlike the comic his nickname is not Blueberry) has dark memories of the death of his first love. He keeps peace between the Americans and the natives who had temporarily adopted and taken care of him. The evil actions of Blount, a “white sorcerer” lead him to confront the villain in the Sacred Mountains, and, through shamanic rituals involving a native entheogenic brew, conquer his fears and uncover a suppressed memory he would much rather deny.

When a French filmmaker decides to shoot a western, you can be certain that his take on the genre wont be traditional. Indeed, Blueberry has more to do with Ken Russells Altered States (1980) than with Howard Hawks Rio Bravo (1958). The film draws its inspiration from a popular graphic novel series published in France since 1965 under the supervision of legendary artist Jean Moebius Giraud.

Mike Blueberry (played by French star Vincent Cassel) is a lonesome, troubled marshal who confronts his arch-enemy (Michael Madsen) in a fight for the freedom of the Indian tribe in which he grew up. In order to find the answers hes seeking, Blueberry submits himself to a series of shamanistic rites that open him to a new level of consciousness and to painful, long forgotten memories that will ultimately decide his fate.

A Life-Changing Experience

Chabrier realized very quickly that he wouldnt be able to put Kounens visions on screen if he didnt try it himself. Thus, one day, he flew to Peru with Kounen and Cassel to meet a master shaman. The experience had a profound effect on me, although not to the extent of what it had done to Jan, admits Chabrier. However, after my first trance, I was convinced that there was no way this experience could be shown on film. To me, even if you filmed it in IMAX and projected it at Showscan speed (60 fps), it still would only represent 1/1000th of the real thing! I couldnt see how we could possibly do it.

Most people have misconceptions about what shamanism really is. They often associate it with spirituality, while a shamanistic trance is basically a deeply personal journey. Chabrier adds, Its difficult to explain shamanism in a few words, but Jan likes to say that, as NASA takes humans into space, shamans take you to your inner self, to your deepest levels of consciousness. When you live this experience, you never make the same journey twice and two people never make the same journey, which makes it very difficult to describe. Still, the incredible thing is that there are some visions that everybody experiences: spiders, snakes, fractal forms, perception of the immensely small and the immensely large These similarities allowed us to find a common language to describe and share what we had experienced.

Astral Institute: How did you first hear about Lucid Dreaming?

David: I spontaneously had my first lucid dream when I was sixteen years old, several days after a psychedelic experience with a purple microdot of LSD. I first read about the phenomenon of lucid dreaming a few months later in Carols Castaneda’s delightful book Journey to Ixlan, and I immediately knew what the author was referring to. Then, a few years later, I met Stanford researcher Stephen LaBerge through a mutual friend, and became familiar with his scientific research on lucid dreaming. Ever since then I’ve been practicing lucid dreaming techniques, and recording my lucid dreams, which has been going on now for over thirty-five years.

Astral Institute: Have you had a Lucid Dream, and if so, could you tell us about your first one?

David: I’ve had hundreds of lucid dreams, experiences with sleep paralysis, shamanic voyages, and out of body experiences over the years. My first experience with lucid dreaming wasn’t particularly memorable, as I woke up from it too quickly, and didn’t fully understand the possibilities. It wasn’t until I met Stephen LaBerge, and began practicing the techniques that he developed, that I began to have more interesting experiences and explore the extraordinary possibilities of fantasy fulfillment. As with many people, in my first lucid dreams I experimented a lot with flying through the air, and exploring erotic possibilities with idealized lovers. It wasn’t until later that I started to use it for psychological growth, performance enhancement, healing, psychic connection, spiritual development, and communication with Higher Intelligence.

Astral Institute: When did you decide to dedicate your time to working on consciousness?

David: I began as a teenager— soon after I began meditating, lucid dreaming, and experiencing with cannabis and psychedelics. It started out as an interest in developing bridges between science, the occult, and spirituality. I spent ten years studying and researching psychobiology— the interface between psychology and biology— at the University of Southern California and New York University. I was greatly influenced by the work of Timothy Leary, Robert Anton Wilson, John Lilly, and Terrence McKenna. With time, this passionate interest grew into a spiritual commitment to helping consciousness evolve to higher levels on this wayward planet.

Astral Institute: Can you define your work for us?

David: I’m largely a science writer, and independent scientific researcher, although I also think of myself as an evolutionary agent, here on this planet with a vital mission to help raise consciousness. I explore and write about cutting-edge science associated with the mind. My academic background is in neuroscience and I worked for several years with British biologist Rupert Sheldrake on several studies to do with psychic phenomena. I worked for five years as the senior editor for the MAPS (Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies) Bulletins, and my articles and interviews have appeared in a wide range of diverse publications. In addition to my books on lucid dreaming and psychedelic science, I’ve written over a dozen books about the evolution of consciousness, achieving optimal health, and two science fiction novels. I’m currently working on my fifth interview collection, with my wife, which will be with women visionary artists and published by Inner Traditions.

Astral Institute: What techniques do you consider to be the most practical in studying lucid dreaming?

David: I think that the best scientific methods for studying lucid dreams would be the EEG and fMRI scans that they do of people’s brains, while they’re lucid dreaming, and when the subjects can communicate to the waking world via voluntary eye movements from within the dream state. The best technique that I’m aware of for initiating lucid dreams is to get in the regular habit of asking one’s self that all important question: Am I dreaming right now? It’s essential that we take this question seriously each time we ask it, and perform a reality test to determine which reality we’re actually in— or else when we ask ourselves this question in a dream, we’ll just conclude that we’re awake and not dreaming! A good reality test is to look at some written words, memorize what they say, look away, and look back again at the words. In a dream, the words will almost always change. Another good reality test is to try breathing through your pinched nostrils; in a dream this can be easily done. Waking up a few hours before usual— and doing something to generally arouse your brain for a half hour or so, and then going back to sleep, also sometimes triggers more frequent lucid dreams. In my book I described dozens of different techniques that increase the probability of having a lucid dream.

Astral Institute: Do you have any advice for those interested in learning more?

David: Yes. Get a journal and start diligently writing down your dreams every time you wake up; the more attention that you pay to your dreams, the more likely you’ll remember them— and the more likely you’ll have a lucid dream. As I mentioned earlier, it’s helpful to get into the regular habit of taking reality tests every hour or so, to determine which reality that you’re presently in. Read as much as you can about lucid dreaming; order a copy of my book Dreaming Wide Awake tonight, and read from it every night before going to sleep. Talk to lots of people about lucid dreaming; mention it to everyone you speak with. The more that you think about lucid dreaming, the more that you engage in conversations about lucid dreaming, the more likely you are to have one. I wouldn’t be surprised if a good percentage of the people reading this interview achieve lucidity in a dream tonight. Wishing everyone sweet lucid dreams.


DREAMING: WIDE AWAKE

A detailed guide to mastering lucid dreaming for physical and emotional healing, enhanced creativity, and spiritual awakening
• Offers methods to improve lucid dreaming abilities and techniques for developing superpowers in the dream realm
• Explains how to enhance dreaming with supplements, herbs, and psychedelics
• Explores the ability of lucid dreamers to communicate with the waking realm and the potential for shared lucid dreaming and access to our unconscious minds

In a lucid dream, you “awaken” within your dream and realize you are dreaming. With this extraordinary sense of awakening comes a clear perception of the continuity of self between waking and sleeping and the ability to significantly influence what happens within the dream, giving you the opportunity to genuinely experience anything without physical or social consequences. In this way, lucid dreaming offers therapeutic opportunities for fantasy fulfillment, fear confrontation, and releasing the trauma of past experiences. With development and practice, lucid dreaming can provide a powerful path to greater awareness, heightened creativity, spiritual awakening, and communication with the vast interconnected web of cosmic consciousness.

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David Jay Brown is the author of 15 books, including Dreaming Wide Awake: Lucid Dreaming, Shamanic Healing and Psychedelics, and The New Science of Psychedelics: At the Nexus of Culture, Consciousness, and Spirituality. He is also the coauthor of five bestselling volumes of interviews with leading-edge thinkers, Mavericks of the Mind, Voices from the Edge, Conversations on the Edge of the Apocalypse, Mavericks of Medicine, and Frontiers of Psychedelic Consciousness. Additionally, Brown is the author of two science fiction novels, Brainchild and Virus, and he is the coauthor of the health science book Detox with Oral Chelation. Brown holds a master’s degree in psychobiology from New York University, and was responsible for the California-based research in two of British biologist Rupert Sheldrake’s books on unexplained phenomena in science: Dogs That Know When Their Owners Are Coming Home and The Sense of Being Stared At. His work has appeared in numerous magazines, including Wired, Discover, and Scientific American, and he was the Senior Editor of the special edition, themed MAPS (Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies) Bulletins from 2007 to 2012. In 2011, 2012, and 2013 Brown was voted “Best Writer” in the annual Good Times and Santa Cruz Weekly’s “Best of Santa Cruz” polls, and his news stories have been picked up by The Huffington Post and CBS News. To find out more about his work see: www.mavericksofthemind.com