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The Creative Dreams

The dreaming mind has creative capacities beyond what the waking mind can fully come to terms with. Like full-blown hallucinations, in dreams a deep part of our own mechanics can put together places, people, and situations. And the dream-generator does this in real-time.

During the dreaming state of sleep, we experience the different levels of consciousness and receive input from the different dimensions of the spirit world. Through dreaming, we have special access to our spirit within. According to the Cayce readings, there is not a question we can ask which cannot be answered from the depths of our inner consciousness when the proper attunement is made.

A dream may be of a physical, mental, or spiritual nature and may deal with all manner of psychic manifestations. These include telepathy, clairvoyance, prophetic visions, out of body traveling, remembrance of past lives, communication with beings in other dimensions including deceased friends and relatives, spirit guides, angels, Christ, and even the voice of God. Dreams can also give invaluable information on the status of the body.

All subconscious minds are in contact with one another. Through the subconscious, dreams may place us in attunement with those in the physical plane or those in the spiritual plane. We may be visited in the night by discarnate entities for many reasons: they may seek to give us assurance about their well-being in other planes of existence; they may come seeking our aid through prayer; they may come to bring us information which may be very helpful or limited; or they may come to influence us with their own desires or perspectives, which may be helpful or harmful. For example, there are dream reports of deceased relatives appearing and giving instructions about where to find a will or a lost object.

Here are some tips from the Cayce readings to help you in the analysis of your dreams:

1) Keep a notebook beside the bed. Record your dreams as soon as possible after waking.

2) Suggest to yourself every night as you fall asleep, “I will remember my dreams.”

3) If you wake during the night, write down the main symbols, and the entire dream will usually come back in the morning.

4) Practice keen observation in your dreams through self-suggestion prior to sleep.

5) Look for these components in your dreams: the setting, the people, the action, the color, the feeling, and the words.

6) Work on analyzing your dreams every day, otherwise their progression will be difficult to assess.

7) If dreams are illogical, three reasons are possible:

a. Only the fragments of the dream have been recalled.
b. The dream is reflecting something illogical in the dreamer’s life.
c. Mental blocks have erased your recall.

8) If you are unable to decipher an important dream, suggest to yourself, before your next sleep, that the dream repeat itself more clearly.

9) Nightmares, which bring with them an inability to move or cry out, usually indicate the wrong diet. To end the nightmarish dreams change your diet.

10) Dreams that are unchanged through the years indicate the dreamer’s resistance to change.

11) Dreams of ill health can be either literal or symbolic warnings.

12) When a problem confronts you, ask by prayer for guidance to be sent to you through your dreams.

13) Be practical in your interpretations. Always look first for a lesson. What have you refused to face or been ignoring?

14) Observe carefully recurrent dreams, as well as the serially progressive ones. These often illustrate progress or failure.

15) Dreams are the reaction of the inner self to daytime activity and often show the way out of the dilemma. So relate them to current activity, because dreams may be retrospective as well as prospective.

16) Dreams come to guide and help, not to amuse. They direct your attention to errors of omission and commission and offer encouragement for right endeavors. They also give us the opportunity to pray for others and to help them bear their burdens.

17) If you receive an unusual message, reduce it to common terms. See if the symbolism of the Bible can be of help in interpreting the dream.

18) Look for past-life experiences in your dreams. These manifest themselves not only in color, but in the proper costume and setting of their period. They come to warn you against repeating the same old mistakes; to explain your relationship and reactions to certain people and places; to reduce your confusions; to enable you to better understand life.

19) Do not fear conversation with the so-called “dead” in dreams. If the communication is one-sided, it denotes telepathy. If both participate, it may be an actual encounter of bodiless consciousness.

20) Dreams are primarily about self. Only a few dreams relate to family, friends, and world events.

21) Watch for mental telepathy in dreams.

22) Remember, persistence is necessary to learn any new language, and dream symbols are the forgotten language of the subconscious.

23) Give daily thanks to God for all things and use daily prayer to improve the quality and reception of your dreams.

Excerpt from the excellent A.R.E. book entitled, “Cayce on Dreams.”[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Edgar Cayce and Astral Projection

Today scientist and the medical world have verified the reading of one of America’s most remarkable men, Edgar Cayce. Cayce discovered at a young age that he could go into hypnosis and travel to other dimensions to obtain psychic information on any subject. He claimed that anyone could do what he did with the proper training and attunement.

When Cayce would go into a hypnotic trance, he would go through a process practically identical to what has been described by Astral Projection practitioners. Here’s a verbatim account of Cayce’s waking description of his journey in the trance state, taken from comments he made at a public lecture:

“I see myself as a tiny dot out of my physical body, which lies inert before me. I find myself oppressed by darkness and there is a feeling of terrific loneliness. Suddenly, I am conscious of a white beam of light, knowing that I must follow it or be lost.

“As I move along this path of light I gradually become conscious of various levels upon which there is movement. Upon the first levels there are vague, horrible shapes, grotesque forms such as one sees in nightmares. Passing on, there begins to appear on either side misshapen forms of human beings with some part of the body magnified. Again there is change and I become conscious of gray-hooded forms moving downward. Gradually, these become lighter in color.

Then the direction changes and these forms move upward and the color of the robes grows rapidly lighter. Next, there begins to appear on either side vague outlines of houses, walls, trees, etc., but everything is motionless. As I pass on, there is more light and movement in what appear to be normal cities and towns. With the growth of movement I become conscious of sounds, at first indistinct rumblings, then music, laughter, and singing of birds. There is more and more light, the colors become very beautiful, and there is the sound of wonderful music. The houses are left behind; ahead there is only a blending of sound and color. Quite suddenly I come upon a hall of records. It is a hall without walls, without ceiling, but I am conscious of seeing an old man who hands me a large book, a record of the individual for whom I seek information.”

On other occasions, Cayce “felt himself to be a bubble traveling through water to arrive at the place where he always got the information” according to records in the A.R.E. library. In another instance, he “went up and up through a very large column”, passing by all the horrible things without coming in contact personally with them, and came out where there was the house of records. Cayce stated that as he ascended the column, there would be beings on either side of him calling out to him for help or trying to get his attention. Cayce knew that any deviation from the column and the beam of light would mean he would not be able to return to his body. It, the column, wound around on a wheel like the Rotarians have. Ultimately, Cayce felt very secure traveling that way.

Edgar Cayce was talking about passing through the lower astral planes. This can be done by anyone, according to Cayce, if the proper “attunement” is made. Cayce also mentions that this is done by everyone when they fall asleep and enter the realm of dreams, only it is done subconsciously not consciously. It is a place where a particular desire has been overemphasized while in physical life. Because Edgar Cayce had approximately 14,000 of these experiences, it is very likely that Cayce holds the record for the number of near-death experiences in one lifetime.

THE EDGAR CAYCE PRIMER

One of the best practical guides to Edgar Cayce was Herbert B. Puryear Primer where it discusses: The sources of psychic development, reincarnation, Karma and grace, dreams, meditation, prayer, personal health (including diet and exercises, ) holistic healing, sexuality, spirituality, rejuvenation, religion, spiritual psychology, and much more. Cayce offers us the keys to insight, enlightenment, and total fulfillment.

GET THE BOOK

 

Sourced from http://www.neardeathsite.com

The first words of Carl Gustav Jung’s Red Book are

The way of what is to come.

What follows is 16 years of the psychoanalyst’s dive into the unconscious mind, a challenge to what he considered Sigmund Frued’s — his former mentor’s — isolated world view. Far from a simple narrative, the Red Book is Jung’s voyage of discovery into his deepest self.