The Korean Powerhouse

For many year now, Korean Cinema has become the leading light of asia and a constant source of inspiration as Hollywood looks east to create blockbusting remakes of well received asian movies. And we believe it will not be long for Hollywood to adapt this latest fantasy movie called Lucid Dream. An impressive thriller based on a similar setting as Christopher Nolan’s Inception.

With an impressive supporting cast headed by Sul Kyung-gu and Kang Hye-jeong, a very popular protagonist in the face of Go Soo, and a more than interesting script based on the concept of the lucid dream, the film ticked all the prerequisites of being a masterpiece.

The Plotline

Dae-ho is an investigative journalist, whose only son is kidnapped at a theme park. Devastated, he gives up his career and devotes himself to finding the perpetrator and his son, but to no avail. Eventually, he learns about lucid dream, a method that allows the patient to control, to some extent, what is happening in his dreams. The method is used for therapeutic purposes, in order for patients to recall lost, traumatic experiences, but Dae-ho, with the help of So-hyeon (Kang Hye-jeong), a friend who is an expert in the field, decides to use the process to find out what happened to his son during the day he was kidnapped. During this process, he faces various obstacles, side effects, and unexpected acquaintances, as he is also assisted by Officer Song Bang-seop (Sul Kyung-gu), who actually believes his findings.

Master of Dreams

Kim Joon-seong-I directs and pens an interesting crime thriller in his debut, setting the film apart by using the concept of lucid dreaming. While the build up and the many plot twists manage to retain the interest of the spectator for the most of the duration, I felt that he took his basic premise a bit too far, as the story also features “masters of dreams”, forceful entries into other people’s dreams, and even a double entry into the same dream. Kim uses these tactics to keep the production entertaining by inducing much action in the film, but in the process, he seems to lose control of the story, even if one considers it a fantasy. In that fashion, he also does not seem to deal very much with the actual concept of the lucid dream, which becomes just an “excuse” for all that is happening on screen.

Furthermore, Kim does not make good use of his cast, particularly of Sul Kyung-gu as Officer Song and Kang Hye-jeong as So-hyeon, with their parts being undeveloped, particularly the latter’s, who becomes almost insignificant after a fashion. At the same time, the choice of Go Soo as Choi Dae-ho seems an unfortunate one, as his physique does not fit the character at all, and I found his performance excessive, particularly in the scenes where the melodrama takes over. I dare say that if the two male actors switched places, the movie would be a much better one.


In terms of visuals on the other hand, “Lucid Dream” is outstanding, with Park Hyun-chul’s cinematography presenting the differences between the real and the dream world in impressive fashion, with prowess that finds its apogee in the action scenes. The same applies to Kim Jae-beom and Kim Sang-beom‘,s editing, which retains the sense of confusion between what is real and what dream in a way that retains the agony for the biggest part of the film.




Inception is a 2010 science fiction heist thriller film.

Written, produced, and directed by Christopher Nolan. The film stars a large ensemble cast. This cast includes Leonardo DiCaprio, Ellen Page, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Marion Cotillard, Ken Watanabe, Tom Hardy, Dileep Rao, Cillian Murphy, Tom Berenger, and Michael Caine. DiCaprio plays a professional thief who commits corporate espionage by infiltrating the subconscious of his targets. He is offered a chance to have his criminal history erased as payment for a task considered to be impossible: “inception”, the implantation of another person’s idea into a target’s subconscious.

Dominick “Dom” Cobb and Arthur  are “extractors”, who perform corporate espionage using an experimental military technology to infiltrate the subconscious of their targets and extract valuable information through a shared dream world. Their latest target, Japanese businessman Saito (Ken Watanabe), reveals that he arranged their mission himself to test Cobb for a seemingly-impossible job: planting an idea in a person’s subconscious, or “inception”.