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Lucid Dreaming

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Dream Theory in Malaya  is titled after a paper by a visionary anthropologist, Kilton Stewart, who in 1935 visited a remarkable highland tribe of Malayan aborigines, the Senoi, whose happiness and well-being were linked to their morning custom of family dream-telling—where a child’s fearful dream of falling was praised as a gift to learn to fly the next night and where a dream-song or dance was taught to a neighboring tribe to create a common bond beyond differences of custom.

Rythm, a neurotechnology startup, launched of Dreem, a pioneering sleep solution that monitors, analyzes, and acts on your brain to enhance your sleep. Dreem represents a completely new category of product that merges cutting edge neuroscience research and disruptive technology to push the understanding and enhancement of sleep forward.

Recently I was asked to review this online course from Awake Academy, but as a long time practitioner of lucid dreaming I felt that I could not do the testimonial justice so I asked a friend to give it a try. I asked him to please dedicate as much time as required to try the complete course and give me feedback.

One of the most accessible and refreshing voices in Lucid Dream circles is the Best Selling Author of Dreams of Awakening, Charlie Morley’s workshops have been introducing new generations of Lucid Dreaming ‘entuasists’ for many years.

Having read his book I was happy to try out Charlie’s online course which promised to be a perfect introduction to the subject using his years of experience in the subject. One of the main benefits from learning from Charlie is his holistic approach to Lucid dreaming and its natural connection with mindfulness in everyday life. Charlie’s method of teaching is light hearted and less intimidating than many other experts on the subject.

Lucid Dreaming

Being aware inside of a dream is not unlike the awareness you’re currently feeling as you read these words—except the worlds in your dreams lack certain consistencies. For example, if you were to click back on your browser at this very moment, then click forward, you’d end up on this webpage again. In a dream state, you might click back then forward and end up on a different webpage, or on a sailboat. Dreams are not consistent, and spotting those inconsistencies is one of the easiest ways to realize you’re dreaming, which is the first step to becoming lucid.

But to truly understand what it feels like to be lucid in your dream, you need to possess a better understanding of what it feels like to be lucid in the real world. This exercise, from the book Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming by Stephen LaBerge, Ph.D., and Howard Rheingold, will be your first assignment. Do all of these steps once a day:

  • Look: Become aware of what you see: notice the richly varied and vivid impressions—shapes, colors, movement, dimensionality, the entire visible world.
  • Listen: Become aware of what you hear: register the various sounds taken in by your ears—a diverse range of intensities, pitches, and tonal qualities, perhaps including the commonplace miracle of speech or the wonder of music.
  • Feel: Become aware of what you touch: texture (smooth, rough, dry, sticky, or wet), weight (heavy, light, solid, or empty), temperature, and the rest. Also note how your body feels right now and compare that to the many other ways it feels at other times, tired or energetic, stiff or limber, painful or pleasant, and so on.
  • Taste: Become aware of what it is like to taste: taste a number of different foods and substances, or remember and vividly imagine their tastes.
  • Smell: Become aware of what you smell: the odor of warm bodies, earth, incense, smoke, perfume, coffee, onions, alcohol, and the sea. Remember and imagine as many of them as you can.
  • Breathing: Attend to your breathing. A moment ago you probably were not consciously aware of your breathing even though you have inhaled and exhaled fifty times while doing this exercise. Hold your breath for a few seconds. Let it out. Now take a deep breath. Notice that being conscious of your breathing allows you to alter it deliberately.
  • Emotions: Become aware of your feelings. Remember the difference between anger and joy, serenity and excitement, and as many other emotions as you care to feel. How real do emotions feel?
  • Thoughts: Become aware of your thoughts. What have you been thinking while doing this exercise? What are you thinking right now? How real do thoughts seem?

Pause and reflect on these things, or even write them down. You use these senses and experience these other things at all times throughout the day, but how often do you really pay attention to them? The more in-tune you can become with your senses and feelings, the more easily you’ll be able to use them as tools in the dream state. After all, you can’t conjure a pleasant sunset beach in your mind if you don’t know how to define and recall the smell of the ocean breeze, the texture of sand between your toes, the color of light on the horizon, or how relaxing it feels to be somewhere so peaceful.

Once you’ve done that, move on to these last two steps:

  • “I”: Become aware of the fact that your world always includes you. As William James noted, it is I see, I hear, I feel, I think that is the basic fact of experience. You are not what you see, hear, think, or feel; you have these experiences. Perhaps most essentially, you are who is aware. You are always at the center of your multidimensional universe of experience, but you are not always consciously aware of yourself. Briefly repeat the exercise with the following difference: At the same time you attend to each of the various aspects of your experience, be aware that it is you who is noticing these things (“I see the light…”).
  • Awareness of awareness: Finally, become aware of your awareness. Normally, awareness focuses on objects outside ourselves, but it can itself be an object of awareness… Here, experience cannot be adequately expressed by language.

Congratulations: you have taken your first step to becoming an oneironaut, or “explorer of dreams.” Next week, we’ll go over the many benefits of lucid dreaming—and some of the minor dangers—and discuss the importance of building dream memory. You’ll also get a brand-new assignment.

Until then, feel free to ask questions or discuss your own experiences in the comments below. How did you feel doing the assignment? Have you had a lucid dream before? Some people get beginner’s luck and have a lucid dream simply after hearing about the phenomenon for the first time. This is your classroom, so discuss dreaming with your classmates.

You spend a third of your life asleep. Why not do something with it? Okay, Oneironauts: sleep tight and dream on.

Source Lifehacker

Simple Awareness

Comparison of dreams with waking consciousness has traditionally focused on claims that the dreaming mind maintains only a simple awareness of perception and emotion, but lacks the self-reflective awareness and metacognition, that is, awareness of one`s current state of consciousness, which is assumed in wake. Lucid dreams are distinct in that the dreamer does have insight into the present state of consciousness, and is able to maintain some awareness of the fact that they are dreaming, along with a varying degree of control over their thoughts, actions, and dream qualities. While this distinction is tied to the dream state, the truth is that even in waking we often wander around in a state of semi-consciousness, simply perceiving and experiencing emotions as they arise without affording much reflective awareness or attention to the present moment.

The practice of mindfulness is aimed at improving an individual`s capacity to maintain awareness of the present moment, with an open and non-judgemental mind, and to diminish automatic habits of mind-wandering and other auto-pilot behaviors. Evidence shows that increased mindfulness is associated with enhanced well-being and decreased negative rumination. Relating to dreams, mindfulness has been shown to be inversely related to dream anxiety and negative dream quality (Simor, Koteles, Sandor, Petke, & Bodizs, 2011). Taken together, by improving attention to the present moment`s consciousness while cultivating an accepting attitude, mindfulness may similarly increase the likelihood and frequency of lucid dream experiences, a dream state characterized by both awareness and positivity. The authors, Stumbrys, Erlacher, and Malinowski (2015), recently set out to test this relationship.

Mindfulness Scale

The main measure for assessing mindfulness was the Freiburg Mindfulness Inventory (FMI; Walach, Buchheld, Buttenmuller, Kleinknecht, & Schmidt, 2004), which measures two interrelated factors of Acceptance and Presence, using 14 items on a 4 point scale. Acceptance refers to the accepting and appreciative attitude towards experience, while Presence refers to sustaining full awareness of experience as it is happening. Presence has been linked to improvements in a wide range of cognitive abilities, perhaps due to the role of cognitive control in maintaining focused attention and continuously monitoring the stream of consciousness. While mindfulness training does not explicitly aim to enhance awareness in the dreaming state, there are many traditions which have linked cultivating awareness in wake with lucid dreaming at night; lucid dreaming itself has even been considered an ideal state for meditative awareness (particularly in Tibetan and Toaist Dream Yoga traditions). Further, while many meditation practices do not specifically define mindfulness, they often have similar aims of promoting awareness and acceptance. Thus, the authors investigated a potential influence of prior meditation practice, even those not explicitly defined as mindfulness practices, on lucid dream frequency.

528 participants (290 men, 238 women) recruited through a German lucid dreaming website responded to an online questionnaire regarding dreaming, meditation, and mindfulness. Both dream recall frequency and lucid dream recall frequency (defined as a dream where `one is aware that one is dreaming during the dream`) were estimated per week. Participants were asked if they had any meditation experience, for how long they had practiced, and estimated how many hours per week they practiced. Lastly, they completed the aforementioned Freiburg Mindfulness Inventory questionnaire.

The Relationship

The main findings of the study showed that participants who reported having prior meditation experience also reported higher lucid dream frequency, with approximately 4.28 vs 2.55 lucid dreams per month. Further, those having meditation experience also reported higher FMI mindfulness scores. Specifically, years of experience and hours of practice per week were correlated with mindfulness scores. The authors conducted more complex analyses to extricate the mediating role of meditation on the relationship between mindfulness and lucid dreaming. What they found was, only in those subjects who have prior meditation experience was there a significant correlation between FMI mindfulness score and lucid dreaming frequency. Those subjects without meditation experience showed no relationship between FMI score and lucid dream frequency.

Thus, their hypotheses were partially confirmed; individual mindfulness is positively related to lucid dream frequency but only in those subjects who practice meditation. Further, these individuals report higher mindfulness and lucid dreaming frequency in general than people without meditation experience. The authors conclude that “higher awareness cultivated during daytime is also reflected in higher awareness of one`s mental states while dreaming.” Future research may seek to delineate which types of meditation practice are most directly influential on dreaming, and perhaps in the future, the possibilities of practicing meditation even from within the lucid dream state.

Michelle Carr, Ph.D, is a researcher at Swansea University Sleep Laboratory. She holds a PhD in Biomedical Science from the University of Montreal, where she conducted research at the Dream and Nightmare Laboratory.  Prior to that, she received dual degrees, a BS in Brain and Cognitive Science and a BA in Psychology, from the University of Rochester in 2010. Her work focuses on the role of REM sleep and dreams in emotional memory, along with comparative studies of nightmare disorder and PTSD. Other research interests include sleep paralysis, lucid dreaming, consciousness studies, and the use of dreamwork in psychology.

References

Simor, P., Koeteles, F., Sandor, P., Petke, Z., & Bodizs, R. (2011). Mindfulness and dream quality: the inverse relationship between mindfulness and negative dream affect. Scandinavian journal of psychology, 52(4), 369-375.

Stumbrys, T., Erlacher, D., & Malinowski, P. (2015). Meta-Awareness During Day and Night The Relationship Between Mindfulness and Lucid Dreaming.Imagination, Cognition and Personality, 34(4), 415-433.

Walach, H., Buchheld, N., Buttenmüller, V., Kleinknecht, N., & Schmidt, S. (2006). Measuring mindfulness—the Freiburg mindfulness inventory (FMI).Personality and Individual Differences, 40(8), 1543-1555.

 

Source: https://www.psychologytoday.com

One of the biggest challenges to achieving BIG lucid dreams is maintaining stability.
By stability, I mean maintaining a strong lucid presence in the dream. Because of the huge Aha! moment when realizing you are in a dream, an excitement will take hold of the novice which causes waking up, and the end of the lucid dream – usually seconds after it begins. This is usually the case in both spontaneous/unplanned lucid dreams and also for the desired/yet-poorly-planned-for lucid dreams. Proper preparation involves knowing how to stabilize the “dream body” so that you neither wake up nor fade back into ordinary dreaming.

Spinning

Not really a problem. Certain “physical” movements and mnemonic techniques can vastly increase your chances of staying tethered to lucidity. The first method is described by Dr. Stephen LaBerge, and many lucid dreamers, myself included, can testify to its efficacy. This stabilization technique requires for you to spin-around in your dream-body like an ice-skater or a Sufi dervish dancer, dreidel, or maybe just a silly child. Usually my spinning was very fast, much faster than I can spin my real body around on regular ground. Something about the motion increases your lucidity, making your perception brighter and your knowledge of being in a dream more permanent. Also, interesting to note, your environment might change after the spinning from what it was pre-spin. Sometimes there will just be small changes: One time I spun around after becoming lucid, and it was dark outside through the windows prior to the stabilization, but light afterwards. You can use this peculiarity of spinning to focus your mind on appearing somewhere particular after spinning.

Hands

Another stabilization technique is to rub your hands together. Doing this at the beginning of your lucid realization and occasionally throughout the dream will help to maintain both perceptual vividness and lucidity. But maybe you need your hands for something? A third stabilization technique you can use, and you should probably combine it with the other two, is repeating a phrase out-loud such as “Lucidity Now!” or “More Lucidity!” or something like this.

Movement is the key

There are numerous other stabilization methods, but I’ve found that the above techniques work best. The real key seems to be movement. Conscious thought, all thought, is available to serve physical behavior. Movement of the skeletal muscles by will, or feelings of movement – proprioception – trigger a heightened awareness. Lucid dreaming is sometimes preceded either directly or in earlier dreams by intense movements – being chased or falling, flying, roller-coaster or wild driving, even spinning around like on a rope. If you can relax while primed for a Waking Induced Lucid Dream (WILD), you may be able to consciously visualize yourself spinning around and enter lucidity directly from falling asleep.

Remember, this is easy to forget. It is easy to forget that you are in a dream. Do what you can to maintain an awareness of the virtual reality of your situation.

Source: http://www.theluciddreamsite.com/stabilization.html

Dreamleaf is the most advanced lucid dreaming supplement on the planet. Recently featured on CBS’s daytime TV show The Doctors, Dream Leaf is specially formulated to do 4 things…

  • INDUCE LUCID DREAMING. Dream Leaf activates the neurotransmitters involved in conscious dreaming, helping you maintain a level of consciousness and control while dreaming so you can have incredibly vivid, memorable lucid dreams.
  • ENHANCE DREAM RECALL. Dream Leaf raises your Acetylcholine levels and enhances your ability to better remember your dreams.
  • PROMOTE BALANCED SLEEP. Dream Leaf helps you experience a healthy balance of deep sleep and REM sleep to ensure that you wake up feeling refreshed and well-rested.
  • CREATE LONGER DREAMS. Dream Leaf lengthens your natural REM sleep cycle, causing your dreams to be much longer and much more vivid.

The Product

Several weeks ago, I was asked to review a product to review called Dreamleaf, and although not normally interested in trying supplements to improve my dream states, I have on occasion being tempted to try some without any real success, so after reading into it more I decided to give it a go. I waited until the weekend to be sure of giving it the best possible trial. On the Friday night, I took my first test run. Having read through the instructions on the pack and I jumped right in.

The Dreamleaf Promise

Dreamleaf promised to activate the neurotransmitters involved in conscious dreaming, which would help me to have matchless lucid dreams.

  • Mugwort helps calm your nerves. This is a popular dream herb for many lucid dream enthusiasts because it also causes your dreams to be highly creative and much more vivid.
  • 5-HTP Boosts serotonin levels, causing what’s known as the “REM rebound effect.” This effect lengthens dreams during the 2nd half of the night, providing a much larger window for your lucid dreams to be experienced in.
  • Huperzine-A slows the breakdown of ACh, which helps you maintain access to your reality memories. Huperzine A helps you to have lucid dreams.
  • Alpha GPC promotes rational thinking during REM sleep and functions as an incredible catalyst for lucid dream induction.
  • Choline assists Huperzine-A in raising Acetylcholine levels. It is the single most effective supplement for dream recall. Since memory and lucid dreaming are interconnected, this ingredient works wonders while you sleep.

This is obviously a big claim and the results would depend on external factors such as diet, activity and lifestyle. But the science behind the product was sound and I was happy to give it a go.

The First Results

So I took the prescribed blue pill before going to sleep at which point I when through my normal pre-sleep lucid dreaming process, then set my alarm for 4 hours into sleep as recommanded to take the red pill. I slept well and found it hard to wake during the night, but luckily I had the red pill on my nightstand and quick took it before going back to sleep.

That’s when the magic happened, I felt like Alice falling through the rabbit hole as I slipped into unconsciousness; I quickly became lucidly aware that I was in a dream. It was as if the active self-aware part of my mind had not switched off as my body relaxed. I was actively in a dream while completely aware that I had just falling asleep. The sensation was intense and the dream had a hyper reality even more intense than waking life. It became on of the most immersive lucid dream experiences I’ve ever experienced. The sheer vividness of the dream and total lucidity blew my mind.

In giving this testimonial I must point out that I have been experimenting with Lucid Dreaming for many years and activity focus on dream recall. So I am not a novice and results would depend on the individual but I can say that the results were beyond what I personally expected from a food supplement.

We Recommend Dreamleaf

In my opinion, Dreamleaf out performs any other nutritional supplement on the market and to date I have never had anywhere near as positive results with another product. In saying that, I also believe that this product will not work without combining it with other Lucid Dreaming Training Methods. It is a very strong and very powerful complement to other lucid dreaming practices and it should be used with other techniques to guarantee success.

Warming: Due to the intensity of the Lucid Dreaming Experiences possible through the use of this product, I do not recommend it to anyone who does not have a full understanding of how to control lucid dreams.

TRY DREAMLEAF FOR YOURSELF

 

 

Astral Institute: How did you first hear about Lucid Dreaming?

David: I spontaneously had my first lucid dream when I was sixteen years old, several days after a psychedelic experience with a purple microdot of LSD. I first read about the phenomenon of lucid dreaming a few months later in Carols Castaneda’s delightful book Journey to Ixlan, and I immediately knew what the author was referring to. Then, a few years later, I met Stanford researcher Stephen LaBerge through a mutual friend, and became familiar with his scientific research on lucid dreaming. Ever since then I’ve been practicing lucid dreaming techniques, and recording my lucid dreams, which has been going on now for over thirty-five years.

Astral Institute: Have you had a Lucid Dream, and if so, could you tell us about your first one?

David: I’ve had hundreds of lucid dreams, experiences with sleep paralysis, shamanic voyages, and out of body experiences over the years. My first experience with lucid dreaming wasn’t particularly memorable, as I woke up from it too quickly, and didn’t fully understand the possibilities. It wasn’t until I met Stephen LaBerge, and began practicing the techniques that he developed, that I began to have more interesting experiences and explore the extraordinary possibilities of fantasy fulfillment. As with many people, in my first lucid dreams I experimented a lot with flying through the air, and exploring erotic possibilities with idealized lovers. It wasn’t until later that I started to use it for psychological growth, performance enhancement, healing, psychic connection, spiritual development, and communication with Higher Intelligence.

Astral Institute: When did you decide to dedicate your time to working on consciousness?

David: I began as a teenager— soon after I began meditating, lucid dreaming, and experiencing with cannabis and psychedelics. It started out as an interest in developing bridges between science, the occult, and spirituality. I spent ten years studying and researching psychobiology— the interface between psychology and biology— at the University of Southern California and New York University. I was greatly influenced by the work of Timothy Leary, Robert Anton Wilson, John Lilly, and Terrence McKenna. With time, this passionate interest grew into a spiritual commitment to helping consciousness evolve to higher levels on this wayward planet.

Astral Institute: Can you define your work for us?

David: I’m largely a science writer, and independent scientific researcher, although I also think of myself as an evolutionary agent, here on this planet with a vital mission to help raise consciousness. I explore and write about cutting-edge science associated with the mind. My academic background is in neuroscience and I worked for several years with British biologist Rupert Sheldrake on several studies to do with psychic phenomena. I worked for five years as the senior editor for the MAPS (Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies) Bulletins, and my articles and interviews have appeared in a wide range of diverse publications. In addition to my books on lucid dreaming and psychedelic science, I’ve written over a dozen books about the evolution of consciousness, achieving optimal health, and two science fiction novels. I’m currently working on my fifth interview collection, with my wife, which will be with women visionary artists and published by Inner Traditions.

Astral Institute: What techniques do you consider to be the most practical in studying lucid dreaming?

David: I think that the best scientific methods for studying lucid dreams would be the EEG and fMRI scans that they do of people’s brains, while they’re lucid dreaming, and when the subjects can communicate to the waking world via voluntary eye movements from within the dream state. The best technique that I’m aware of for initiating lucid dreams is to get in the regular habit of asking one’s self that all important question: Am I dreaming right now? It’s essential that we take this question seriously each time we ask it, and perform a reality test to determine which reality we’re actually in— or else when we ask ourselves this question in a dream, we’ll just conclude that we’re awake and not dreaming! A good reality test is to look at some written words, memorize what they say, look away, and look back again at the words. In a dream, the words will almost always change. Another good reality test is to try breathing through your pinched nostrils; in a dream this can be easily done. Waking up a few hours before usual— and doing something to generally arouse your brain for a half hour or so, and then going back to sleep, also sometimes triggers more frequent lucid dreams. In my book I described dozens of different techniques that increase the probability of having a lucid dream.

Astral Institute: Do you have any advice for those interested in learning more?

David: Yes. Get a journal and start diligently writing down your dreams every time you wake up; the more attention that you pay to your dreams, the more likely you’ll remember them— and the more likely you’ll have a lucid dream. As I mentioned earlier, it’s helpful to get into the regular habit of taking reality tests every hour or so, to determine which reality that you’re presently in. Read as much as you can about lucid dreaming; order a copy of my book Dreaming Wide Awake tonight, and read from it every night before going to sleep. Talk to lots of people about lucid dreaming; mention it to everyone you speak with. The more that you think about lucid dreaming, the more that you engage in conversations about lucid dreaming, the more likely you are to have one. I wouldn’t be surprised if a good percentage of the people reading this interview achieve lucidity in a dream tonight. Wishing everyone sweet lucid dreams.


DREAMING: WIDE AWAKE

A detailed guide to mastering lucid dreaming for physical and emotional healing, enhanced creativity, and spiritual awakening
• Offers methods to improve lucid dreaming abilities and techniques for developing superpowers in the dream realm
• Explains how to enhance dreaming with supplements, herbs, and psychedelics
• Explores the ability of lucid dreamers to communicate with the waking realm and the potential for shared lucid dreaming and access to our unconscious minds

In a lucid dream, you “awaken” within your dream and realize you are dreaming. With this extraordinary sense of awakening comes a clear perception of the continuity of self between waking and sleeping and the ability to significantly influence what happens within the dream, giving you the opportunity to genuinely experience anything without physical or social consequences. In this way, lucid dreaming offers therapeutic opportunities for fantasy fulfillment, fear confrontation, and releasing the trauma of past experiences. With development and practice, lucid dreaming can provide a powerful path to greater awareness, heightened creativity, spiritual awakening, and communication with the vast interconnected web of cosmic consciousness.

Amazon-preorder

 

David Jay Brown is the author of 15 books, including Dreaming Wide Awake: Lucid Dreaming, Shamanic Healing and Psychedelics, and The New Science of Psychedelics: At the Nexus of Culture, Consciousness, and Spirituality. He is also the coauthor of five bestselling volumes of interviews with leading-edge thinkers, Mavericks of the Mind, Voices from the Edge, Conversations on the Edge of the Apocalypse, Mavericks of Medicine, and Frontiers of Psychedelic Consciousness. Additionally, Brown is the author of two science fiction novels, Brainchild and Virus, and he is the coauthor of the health science book Detox with Oral Chelation. Brown holds a master’s degree in psychobiology from New York University, and was responsible for the California-based research in two of British biologist Rupert Sheldrake’s books on unexplained phenomena in science: Dogs That Know When Their Owners Are Coming Home and The Sense of Being Stared At. His work has appeared in numerous magazines, including Wired, Discover, and Scientific American, and he was the Senior Editor of the special edition, themed MAPS (Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies) Bulletins from 2007 to 2012. In 2011, 2012, and 2013 Brown was voted “Best Writer” in the annual Good Times and Santa Cruz Weekly’s “Best of Santa Cruz” polls, and his news stories have been picked up by The Huffington Post and CBS News. To find out more about his work see: www.mavericksofthemind.com

Meditation practice improves mindfulness while awake, and while you sleep.

Comparison of dreams with waking consciousness has traditionally focused on claims that the dreaming mind maintains only a simple awareness of perception and emotion, but lacks the self-reflective awareness and metacognition, that is, awareness of one`s current state of consciousness, which is assumed in wake. Lucid dreams are distinct in that the dreamer does have insight into the present state of consciousness, and is able to maintain some awareness of the fact that they are dreaming, along with a varying degree of control over their thoughts, actions, and dream qualities. While this distinction is tied to the dream state, the truth is that even in waking we often wander around in a state of semi-consciousness, simply perceiving and experiencing emotions as they arise without affording much reflective awareness or attention to the present moment.

The practice of mindfulness is aimed at improving an individual’s capacity to maintain awareness of the present moment, with an open and non-judgemental mind, and to diminish automatic habits of mind-wandering and other auto-pilot behaviors. Evidence shows that increased mindfulness is associated with enhanced well-being and decreased negative rumination. Taken together, by improving attention to the present moment’s consciousness while cultivating an accepting attitude, mindfulness may similarly increase the likelihood and frequency of lucid dream experiences, a dream state characterized by both awareness and positivity.

Presence has been linked to improvements in a wide range of cognitive abilities, perhaps due to the role of cognitive control in maintaining focused attention and continuously monitoring the stream of consciousness. While mindfulness training does not explicitly aim to enhance awareness in the dreaming state, there are many traditions which have linked cultivating awareness in wake with lucid dreaming at night; lucid dreaming itself has even been considered an ideal state for meditative awareness (particularly in Tibetan and Toaist Dream Yoga traditions).

Further, while many meditation practices do not specifically define mindfulness, they often have similar aims of promoting awareness and acceptance. Thus, the authors investigated a potential influence of prior meditation practice, even those not explicitly defined as mindfulness practices, on lucid dream frequency.

Higher awareness cultivated during daytime is also reflects in higher awareness of one’s mental states while dreaming. Future research may seek to delineate which types of meditation practice are most directly influential on dreaming, and perhaps in the future, the possibilities of practicing meditation even from within the lucid dream state.

Source: Psychology Today