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Denise Linn’s personal journey began as a result of a near-death experience at age 17. Her life-changing experiences and remarkable recovery set her on a spiritual quest that led her to explore the healing traditions of many cultures, including those of her own Cherokee ancestors, the Aborigines in the Australian bush, and the Zulus in Bophuthatswana. She trained with a Hawaiian kahuna (shaman), and Reiki Master Hawayo Takata. She was also adopted into a New Zealand Maori tribe. In addition, Denise lived in a Zen Buddhist monastery for more than two years.

Denise is an internationally renowned teacher in the field of self-development. She’s the author of the bestseller ‘Sacred Space’ and the award-winning ‘Feng Shui for the Soul,’ and has written 18 books, which are available in 29 languages. Denise has appeared in numerous documentaries and television shows worldwide, and gives seminars throughout the world. For information about Denise’s certification programs and other lectures, please visit her Website: www.DeniseLinn.com

Almost all native cultures have traditions of astral travel, which is sometimes referred to as an out-of-body experience. Astral travel is when your spirit is literally separated from your physical body, and it usually occurs during sleep. It’s different from dreaming, as it’s thought to be a tangible experience and not simply an image emerging in your mind during REM sleep. In addition to a sense of separation from the physical body, there’s a self-awareness that’s extremely vivid that accompanies astral travel. Some recount a kind of silver-colored cord attaching the physical body to the astral body during nocturnal sojourns.

No Fear

There appears to be no research indicating that damage results from consciously leaving your body. In truth, it’s a very natural occurrence. It’s interesting to note that when you’re having an out-of-body experience, you don’t experience time or space as you generally do. You may find yourself slightly ahead or behind of temporal space.

Another unique phenomenon you may notice—when you first leave your body—is that you seem to remain very much in your present physical form. However, the longer you’re separated from your physical body, the less delineated the boundaries of the body become, and your “being” appears to transcend into a cloudlike vapor or some other amorphous substance.

One of the biggest blockages to astral travel is fear. Even the most intrepid of us will discover, upon deeper examination, that at some time we’ve come face-to-face with the wall of fear regarding separating from our body. First and foremost is the fear of death—the frightening notion that if we’re separated from our physical body, perhaps we’ll die. Our automatic reaction may be to get back within the physical body quickly because this is where our life is, in the physical.

We tend to have this reaction in spite of our emotional attitudes and intellectual thought processes. Only after repeating the experience many times can we hope to release the fear of death. It’s much like beginning to swim and eventually realizing that your body will float—that you won’t drown.

Another common fear is “Will I be able to get back into my body?” or “Will something occupy my body while I’m traveling?” I can say with absolute certainty that you will return to your body. There’s abundant evidence that those who experience astral travel are always able to return safely. Also, if you are concerned about entities and your body (which are almost never a problem), imagine an egg-like shield surrounding your body before you go to sleep. This simple visualization makes sure that all is well.

Freedom

Astral travel isn’t uncommon in Westernized countries. We often have out-of-body experiences yet fail to recall them. (In fact, during sleep, the sensation of a quick jerk may be indicative of a rapid astral reentry into your body.) However, native tribes take out-of-body experiences for granted.

After I gave a lecture about dreams and astral travel in Australia I  met with a revered Aborigine elder. When I first saw him, he was wearing traditional kangaroo-skin clothing. Part of his upper body was exposed,showing long, deep scars across his chest made during the ceremony that marked a young boy’s transition to manhood. (Ash had been rubbed in the scars as they were healing to make the scars more pronounced.)

“I heard there was a white woman here from the States talking about dreams and astral travel. I wanted to hear what she had to say,” he said.
“Well, what did you think?” I asked, curious about his opinion.

He replied, “Everything you said was accurate, especially what you said about astral travel. All the old fellas travel in this way; it’s how we stay in touch with each other over the long distances that we live. In fact, we can tell who visited us in the night because we each leave a dusting of the earth from our area. Every area has a different type of soil, so it’s easy to tell where the dust came from. But the young folks have forgotten the old ways.”

He went on to explain that as the senior elder of his tribe, he visited young Aboriginal men in prison and taught them astral traveling. “I teach them how to travel, so even though their bodies are imprisoned, their spirits are free,” he said.

Australian Aboriginal elders, Native American shamans, African sangomas, and many healers in native cultures throughout the world practice astral traveling. Numerous esoteric religions and philosophies are based on this experience.

Travel

When I was chatting with Shkotay Maingun (Light of the Wolf), a Cherokee/Ojibwa from Manitoba, Canada, she said that if a traditional healer was not able to physically travel to someone who was in need of healing, he would “travel by clouds.” She said the journey was often arduous and even exhausting to the medicine person, and they needed substantial training to be skilled at this ability.

The pipe carrier would travel in a ceremonial way and enter via the sacred spirit tree in the center of the home. They could not get into the home if they didn’t enter through the tree. (Every home is said to have an invisible, yet very real spirit tree at its center.) Also, the patient needed to prepare for the visit by sleeping with tobacco under their pillow for four days.

Additionally, tobacco and feast food must be laid out as a gift to the spirits who accompany the healer. Shkotay explained that powerful healings could occur in this manner.

The astral body has various names in different cultures:

  • The Hebrews call it ruach.
  • In Egypt, it’s known as ka.
  • The Greeks knew it as eidolon.
  • The Romans called it larva.
  • In Tibet, it’s referred to as the bardo body.
  • Ancient Hindus called it pranamayakosha.
  • Buddhists referred to it as the rupa.
  • In Germany, it is Jüdel, Doppel-gänger, or fylgja.
  • Ancient Britons gave it various terms: fetch, waft, tisk, or fye.
  • In Ancient China, it was thankhi.

Some in the scientific community explain astral travel as an ancestral memory from the days when—according to Darwin’s theory—our predecessors were either aquatic or airborne creatures. Psychologists refer to astral dreams as a type of depersonalization, or a means of avoiding being grounded in normal reality. However, anthropologists have found that astral travel is a common event, deeply rooted in indigenous cultures.

The beliefs of the astral traveler determine the pattern of his or her experience. For example, in Eastern Peru, the shaman imagines he’s leaving his body in the form of a bird. Whereas some Asian tribesmen view the silver cord as a ribbon, thread, or a rainbow. Africans perceive it as a rope, the natives of Borneo, as a ladder.

Regardless of how the phenomenon is defined, it appears common among astral travelers that a type of cord is viewed as a connection between the astral and physical body.

 

Denise Linn’s new book,  Kindling The Native Spirit was released last month and is full of ancient sacred practices to enhance your connection to the mysterious forces around you.

 

Source: https://www.healyourlife.com/astral-projection-101-a-powerful-secret-from-native-cultures

Astral Institute: How did you first hear about Lucid Dreaming?

David: I spontaneously had my first lucid dream when I was sixteen years old, several days after a psychedelic experience with a purple microdot of LSD. I first read about the phenomenon of lucid dreaming a few months later in Carols Castaneda’s delightful book Journey to Ixlan, and I immediately knew what the author was referring to. Then, a few years later, I met Stanford researcher Stephen LaBerge through a mutual friend, and became familiar with his scientific research on lucid dreaming. Ever since then I’ve been practicing lucid dreaming techniques, and recording my lucid dreams, which has been going on now for over thirty-five years.

Astral Institute: Have you had a Lucid Dream, and if so, could you tell us about your first one?

David: I’ve had hundreds of lucid dreams, experiences with sleep paralysis, shamanic voyages, and out of body experiences over the years. My first experience with lucid dreaming wasn’t particularly memorable, as I woke up from it too quickly, and didn’t fully understand the possibilities. It wasn’t until I met Stephen LaBerge, and began practicing the techniques that he developed, that I began to have more interesting experiences and explore the extraordinary possibilities of fantasy fulfillment. As with many people, in my first lucid dreams I experimented a lot with flying through the air, and exploring erotic possibilities with idealized lovers. It wasn’t until later that I started to use it for psychological growth, performance enhancement, healing, psychic connection, spiritual development, and communication with Higher Intelligence.

Astral Institute: When did you decide to dedicate your time to working on consciousness?

David: I began as a teenager— soon after I began meditating, lucid dreaming, and experiencing with cannabis and psychedelics. It started out as an interest in developing bridges between science, the occult, and spirituality. I spent ten years studying and researching psychobiology— the interface between psychology and biology— at the University of Southern California and New York University. I was greatly influenced by the work of Timothy Leary, Robert Anton Wilson, John Lilly, and Terrence McKenna. With time, this passionate interest grew into a spiritual commitment to helping consciousness evolve to higher levels on this wayward planet.

Astral Institute: Can you define your work for us?

David: I’m largely a science writer, and independent scientific researcher, although I also think of myself as an evolutionary agent, here on this planet with a vital mission to help raise consciousness. I explore and write about cutting-edge science associated with the mind. My academic background is in neuroscience and I worked for several years with British biologist Rupert Sheldrake on several studies to do with psychic phenomena. I worked for five years as the senior editor for the MAPS (Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies) Bulletins, and my articles and interviews have appeared in a wide range of diverse publications. In addition to my books on lucid dreaming and psychedelic science, I’ve written over a dozen books about the evolution of consciousness, achieving optimal health, and two science fiction novels. I’m currently working on my fifth interview collection, with my wife, which will be with women visionary artists and published by Inner Traditions.

Astral Institute: What techniques do you consider to be the most practical in studying lucid dreaming?

David: I think that the best scientific methods for studying lucid dreams would be the EEG and fMRI scans that they do of people’s brains, while they’re lucid dreaming, and when the subjects can communicate to the waking world via voluntary eye movements from within the dream state. The best technique that I’m aware of for initiating lucid dreams is to get in the regular habit of asking one’s self that all important question: Am I dreaming right now? It’s essential that we take this question seriously each time we ask it, and perform a reality test to determine which reality we’re actually in— or else when we ask ourselves this question in a dream, we’ll just conclude that we’re awake and not dreaming! A good reality test is to look at some written words, memorize what they say, look away, and look back again at the words. In a dream, the words will almost always change. Another good reality test is to try breathing through your pinched nostrils; in a dream this can be easily done. Waking up a few hours before usual— and doing something to generally arouse your brain for a half hour or so, and then going back to sleep, also sometimes triggers more frequent lucid dreams. In my book I described dozens of different techniques that increase the probability of having a lucid dream.

Astral Institute: Do you have any advice for those interested in learning more?

David: Yes. Get a journal and start diligently writing down your dreams every time you wake up; the more attention that you pay to your dreams, the more likely you’ll remember them— and the more likely you’ll have a lucid dream. As I mentioned earlier, it’s helpful to get into the regular habit of taking reality tests every hour or so, to determine which reality that you’re presently in. Read as much as you can about lucid dreaming; order a copy of my book Dreaming Wide Awake tonight, and read from it every night before going to sleep. Talk to lots of people about lucid dreaming; mention it to everyone you speak with. The more that you think about lucid dreaming, the more that you engage in conversations about lucid dreaming, the more likely you are to have one. I wouldn’t be surprised if a good percentage of the people reading this interview achieve lucidity in a dream tonight. Wishing everyone sweet lucid dreams.


DREAMING: WIDE AWAKE

A detailed guide to mastering lucid dreaming for physical and emotional healing, enhanced creativity, and spiritual awakening
• Offers methods to improve lucid dreaming abilities and techniques for developing superpowers in the dream realm
• Explains how to enhance dreaming with supplements, herbs, and psychedelics
• Explores the ability of lucid dreamers to communicate with the waking realm and the potential for shared lucid dreaming and access to our unconscious minds

In a lucid dream, you “awaken” within your dream and realize you are dreaming. With this extraordinary sense of awakening comes a clear perception of the continuity of self between waking and sleeping and the ability to significantly influence what happens within the dream, giving you the opportunity to genuinely experience anything without physical or social consequences. In this way, lucid dreaming offers therapeutic opportunities for fantasy fulfillment, fear confrontation, and releasing the trauma of past experiences. With development and practice, lucid dreaming can provide a powerful path to greater awareness, heightened creativity, spiritual awakening, and communication with the vast interconnected web of cosmic consciousness.

Amazon-preorder

 

David Jay Brown is the author of 15 books, including Dreaming Wide Awake: Lucid Dreaming, Shamanic Healing and Psychedelics, and The New Science of Psychedelics: At the Nexus of Culture, Consciousness, and Spirituality. He is also the coauthor of five bestselling volumes of interviews with leading-edge thinkers, Mavericks of the Mind, Voices from the Edge, Conversations on the Edge of the Apocalypse, Mavericks of Medicine, and Frontiers of Psychedelic Consciousness. Additionally, Brown is the author of two science fiction novels, Brainchild and Virus, and he is the coauthor of the health science book Detox with Oral Chelation. Brown holds a master’s degree in psychobiology from New York University, and was responsible for the California-based research in two of British biologist Rupert Sheldrake’s books on unexplained phenomena in science: Dogs That Know When Their Owners Are Coming Home and The Sense of Being Stared At. His work has appeared in numerous magazines, including Wired, Discover, and Scientific American, and he was the Senior Editor of the special edition, themed MAPS (Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies) Bulletins from 2007 to 2012. In 2011, 2012, and 2013 Brown was voted “Best Writer” in the annual Good Times and Santa Cruz Weekly’s “Best of Santa Cruz” polls, and his news stories have been picked up by The Huffington Post and CBS News. To find out more about his work see: www.mavericksofthemind.com